Rodeo Drive Condo – CF Shops at Don Mills

Rodeo Drive Condo: RODEO DRIVE’S VILLAGE HIGH STREET—CF SHOPS
AT DON MILLS
For future residents of Rodeo Drive, the Shops at Don Mills will become, more or less, on their arrival the local “high street,” the go-to place to buy a strip sirloin at McEwans, or a bottle of chard at the LCBO, or some eyeliner at Murale. It’s a one-stop shop-ping experience with shops, restaurants, and bars radiating off a village common. When Cadillac Fairview decided to mothball its old cavernous indoor mall, the Don Mills Shopping Centre, they were taking a bit of a gamble. Would the community embrace an open-air mall, especially in the chillier months? Well, it’s a gam-ble that’s clearly paid off, and just a few weeks ago the company announced a $21-million upgrade of the CF Shops at Don Mills to further enhance the user’s shopping, dining and entertainment experience. Among the new features: new cobblestone-like streets, enhanced atmospheric lighting, wider sidewalks, new street furniture and a new en-tertainment/event space to complement the village common at the centre of the mall. Cadillac Fairview’s Niall Collins, Senior Vice-president, Development, isn’t at all sur-prised that folks from across the GTA have embraced their “inner Angeleno,” flocking in droves to Ontario’s first “open-air lifestyle shopping centre.” “Don’t forget, the original Don Mills Centre back in the 1960s was an outdoor mall, and when we were exploring the new concept, we visited similar kinds of malls in the US, many of them with climates similar to ours.” Indeed one of the most successful. Rodeo Drive Condos is the place to be.

FOLKS FROM ACROSS THE GTA HAVE
EMBRACED THEIR “INNER ANGELENO,” FLOCKING IN DROVES TO ONTARIO’S FIRST OPEN-AIR LIFESTYLE SHOPPING CENTRE.
such open-air malls is in Minneapolis, Minne-sota whose sub-arctic climate makes Toron-to’s seem tropical. The trend is becoming so pervasive that the influential New Republic magazine recently published an article trum-peting, “The Mall is Dead. Americans Shop at Lifestyle Centers Now.” CF Shops at Don Mills is clearly ahead of the curve, and adding full-time residents to the mix will just make the vil-lage experience even more delicious. Rodeo Drive is the condo you want.
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Rodeo Drive Condo – futuristic landmarks

Rodeo Drive Condo – futuristic landmarks
From its inception Don Mills has always had very ritzy neighbours—a tradition that carries on to this day. But back in the mid-1950s this area of the GTA was known as “horse country,” and it was the pre-ferred stomping ground for toffs mad keen on hunting foxes, chasing polo balls or just can-tering about the countryside on their favourite steed. All of the great Bayview estates are gone now—the Sifton family’s Armadale is now the Toron-to French School, E.P. Taylor’s Wind-fields Farm, now the Canadian Film Centre, the Bain Family’s Graydon Hall, now an event space, and F.R. Wood’s manor house, now the Cres-cent School. Arguably the grandest estate of the all, Glendon Hall, is now Glendon College, one of Canada’s most unique post-secondary insti-tutions: the only bilingual liberal arts college in the country. Once the home of F.R. Wood’s old-er brother, Edward, Glendon Hall evokes images of Old Money blueb-loods disporting themselves against a backdrop of manicured lawns and Georgian terraces. But today the estate is spiffily up-to-date as sym-bolized by the Montreal architect Renee Daoust’s spectacular glass entrance pavilion for Glendon Col-lege, AKA, The Centre of Excellence. Mr. Wood’s beautiful Italianate man-or house evokes a bygone age; the college’s gorgeous new glass box symbolizes the endless possibilities of the future. Both are just two of the many unique destinations easily accessible to Rodeo Drive residents.
When the Kilgour family donated their Sunnybrook farm to the city for a park, a section was deeded to the federal government in 1948 to create a veterans’ hospital for soldiers recently re-turned from the Second World War. It was, naturally enough, called Sunnybrook, and over the decades it has morphed into a world-re-nowned medical complex. Sunnybrook is Canada’s largest trauma centre and maternity hospital as well as being a teaching hospital for the University of Toronto Faculty of Med-icine. Mining magnate and noted philanthro-pist Seymour Schulich donated millions to create a world-class centre for cardiac care and research and a prominent business fami-ly, the Odettes, gave generously to establish a centre for cancer research. Just minutes from Rodeo Drive on Bayview Avenue, Sunnybrook Hospital is an invaluable community resource for all Don Mills residents. Rodeo Drive Condo
Opening in 1969 to mark Canada’s Centennial two years earlier, the Ontario Science Centre, designed by Raymond Moriyama, is one of Toronto’s greatest cultural attractions. Over fifty million people have visited the world’s first interactive sci-ence museum in its nearly half-century ex-istence and it continues to delight, educate and enthrall its legions of fans. A decade ago the Science Centre completed a $47.5-mil-lion upgrade of its facilities via its Agents of Change initiative. Among the new features was the entirely experimental Weston Family Innovation Centre, an exploration plaza called TELUSCAPE and two permanent art pieces: the FUNtain and Lotic Meander. Science Centre exhibits range from Renais-sance geniuses—Leonardo da Vinci’s Work-shop: Inventor, Artist, Dreamer—to 20th cen-tury wizards: Harry Potter: The Exhibition. Last year a new exhibit quickly became a fan favourite: “To Be an Astronaut,” featuring per-sonal items on loan from Colonel Chris Had-field and chronicling the career trajectory of Canada’s most famous man-in-space. All this adds up to a lot of fun, especially for kids, so it’s hardly surprising that 210,000 Ontario school kids visit the centre each year. Next year visiting the museum will become much easier with the opening of the Science Centre station on the Eglinton Crosstown LRT. But for residents of Rodeo Drive Condo this spectacular cul-tural and education attraction is just a quick hike down Don Mills Road. Enjoy.
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Rodeo Drive Condo – Oasis in heart of city

Rodeo Drive Condo – Oasis in heart of city

From its upper levels, residents of Rodeo Drive will overlook a lush, verdant, al-most Arcadian landscape arguably unlike any other neighbourhood in Toronto. Don Mills/The Bridle Path is, quite simply, awash in a sea of green because of the numerous parks in the area and the immense size of many of the neighbourhood’s residential “estates.” But it is the parks that are public space, open to one and all, and each is special in its own way.-The largest of the green spaces within easy reach of Rodeo Drive is a series of inter-con-nected parks—Sunnybrook, Serena Gundy and Wilket Creek—that form one vast green-sward bordering the ravine bed of the creek. Sunnybrook is the largest of them and was at one time the 147-acre farm of the socially prominent Kilgour family who donated it in the late 1940s to the city as a public park. The estate’s stables still exist and are avidly used by equestrians, young and old, and it’s a de-light even for non-riders to observe the horses at rest inside their paddocks. The park’s vast and immaculately maintained cricket pitches host national and international competitions, and seeing cricketers at bat in summer whites is something out of a picture post card. Serena Gundy is at the south end of Sunny-brook Park, and its one-time 20-hectares on the West Don River Valley, north of Eglinton, was the one-time estate of investment banker James H. Gundy.  It was donated to the city on the proviso that a plaque honouring the bequest be added to the stone gates at the Broadway Avenue entrance. ‘Twas done. An-other green space on the northern boundaries of the neighbourhood is Windfields, gifted to the city by Don Mills founder E.P. Taylor. This nature park contains two hundred year old trees, a pond, a marsh, cross-country trails and wild life and wild flowers galore. Some argue Bond Park is Don Mills’ favour-ite outdoor space and its 6.8-hectares fea-tures five baseball diamonds and a clubhouse. Other smaller parks in the ‘hood include the 1.2-hectare Mike Bela Park, at Lawrence East and Banbury Road, and Talwood Park, on the east side of Leslie north of Lawrence. And fi-nally there’s the 15-hectare Moccasin Trail Park, on Lawrence East at the Don Valley Parkway, featuring walking trails through a naturalized rain forest. With all its abundant greenery,  Don Mills could easily masquerade as “the country” despite its location at the centre of vast metropolis. Yes, it is the Rodeo Drive Condominium.

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Rodeo Drive Condo – Moderism in Don Mills

Rodeo Drive Condo – Moderism in Don Mills
When town planner Macklin Hancock took control of the development of Don Mills he was determined to hire only modernist architects to design the town’s institutions and residences and he proceeded to hire a roster of the best-in-class to execute his vision. Most of them trained in the Bauhaus School, or International Style in vogue in that era, and the group included such prominent names as James Murray, Irving Grossman, Henry Fleiss, Michael Back and, the most notable of all, John C. Parkin. Parkin later collaborated with Mies van der Rohe in designing the Toronto Dominion Cen-tre but it was in Don Mills where he did much of his early work. Some of it has since been demolished, including the Don Mills Conve-nience Centre, the community’s original open-air shopping mall. But three of his most im-portant structures, the Ortho Pharmaceuticals building, a Massey Medal winner, St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church, and Don Mills Collegiate Institute remain in tact. Completed in 1958, DMCI remains one of the central institutions that give Don Mills its spe-cial character, and its generous glazing and entrance portico supported by pencil-thin col-umns betray its modernist roots. In 2015, the school rated a respectable 7.1 (out of 10) in the Fraser Institute’s ratings of Canadian second-ary schools. DMCI offers a gifted programme for its elite students, and is consistently rep-resented at International Maths and Phys-ics Olympiads. And its student population is very diverse: 60% of them come from homes where English is not the first language.

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Rodeo Drive Condos – A world-class garden

Rodeo Drive Condos – A WORLD-CLASS  HORTICULTURAL GARDEN
For a neighbourhood somewhat re-moved from the hurly burly of down-town, Don Mills has an extraordinary collection of cultural, recreational, educational and healthcare “assets” close at hand. World-class is an often over-used adjective but what better term describes the area’s latest addi-tion, the Aga Khan Museum. But this extraor-dinary gift to the Canadian people only ampli-fies the extraordinary array of facilities already in place. Presently plans are afoot to trans-form the Toronto Botanical Garden (TBG), just down the street from the Rodeo Drive site, into a horticultural showcase on par with the best such gardens in the world. “Toronto is the only major city in the world that doesn’t have such a facility,” argues Harry Jongerden, the TGB’s executive director and the guy spear-heading the proposed $31-million makeover. Jongerden and his team have tabled a pro-posal with the city to transform all of Edwards Gardens’ 40-plus acres into one humungous horticultural garden. Presently the TBG has just four acres within the park, a parcel that was given at the garden’s inception in 2006. And he is also the first to admit that the pres-ence of the renowned Royal Botanical Garden down the QEW in Burlington likely explains the absence of a similar facility in Toronto. But he remains undeterred. “New York City has five botanical gardens and most other glob-al cities support more than one.” The benefits of having such a facility in our own backyard are many. In Montreal, their botanical garden is the second most visited cultural attraction in the city.  In Vancouver, the Van Dusen Garden is number six. “Garden tourism is just a really big deal,” argues Jongerden.  A few years back Toronto completed a mas-sive overhaul of its cultural infrastructure with a new opera house and the renovation of the ROM, AGO and the Gardiner Museum. The TBG is the last piece of the city’s cultural in-frastructure puzzle so, stay tuned folks, the launching of a world-class horticultural gar-den is likely to coincide with the opening of Rodeo Drive. And it is mere minutes from your new front door.
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Rodeo Drive Condos – Two visionary developers

Rodeo Drive Condos – Two visionary developers
RODEO DRIVE’S FOUNDING FATHERS—TWO VISIONARY DEVELOPERS WHO’VE TRANSFORMED URBAN CANADA .EP.—“Eddie”–Taylor was one of the great visionary real-estate developers of his era and both Don Mills and Lyford Cay, his luxury resort community in the Bahamas, remain enduring testaments to that fact. And it’s Taylor’s legacy that the two real-estate or-ganizations behind the creation of the “new” Don Mills are hoping to build on. Cadillac Fairview (CF), one of Canada’s largest and  most admired real estate companies, stepped up first with the transformation of the old Don Mills Shopping Centre into Ontario’s first open-air lifestyle retailing village, CF Shops at Don Mills, and its success is confirmed by the company’s recently announced $21-million upgrade to the complex, an expansion already underway. Next up was Lanterra Developments and its decision to co-venture with CF in the creation of Rodeo Drive, an ambitious multiphase residential community within CF Shops at Don Mills precinct. Along with three earlier condominium projects, Liv Lofts, Flaire and Reflections, Rodeo Drive Condominion will truly create a “new” live/work/play/shop urban village in the heart of “old” Don Mills. So who are these two companies and what made them think they could step into Eddie Taylor’s big shoes?  Well both companies in their different ways have for years been at the forefront of, quite simply, the “regeneration” of urban Canada. Created in 1970 with the merger of the Cadil-lac Development Corporation and the Fair-view Corporation, Cadillac Fairview, present-ly valued at $29-billion, owns over 37-million square feet of leasable space in 71 properties across Canada, and it’s a sterling portfolio, in-deed: the CF Toronto-Dominion Centre and the CF Toronto Eaton Centre in Canada’s largest metropolis, CF Pacific Centre in Van-couver, the CF Chinook Centre in Calgary, and many more. Many urban thinkers cite the building of the TD Centre and later the Eaton Centre as crit-ical to the renewal of downtown Toronto as Canada’s preeminent commercial hub. That ability to see potential in real estate ventures early-on has long distinguished CF’s corpo-rate culture, and such foresight was a key fac-tor in the company’s investment at the 41-acre CF Shops at Don Mills site, as well as another important new play in their deal pipeline: the massive redevelopment of the 170-acre But-tonville Toronto Airport as a world-class em-ployment district and a vibrant mixed-use life-style destination. “Don Mills is really a test lab for Buttonville,” says Niall Collins, CF’s Senior Vice President of Development. “It’s a smaller version of what Buttonville will be in the full-ness of time. We are certainly going to use what we learned here as part of the planning mix there.”

That same genius for anticipating what’s hap-pening next in the real-estate business has long distinguished the careers of Mark Man-delbaum and Barry Fenton, the co-founders of Lanterra Developments. And don’t just take our word for it. Awhile back, the Toronto Star lauded the duo for their demonstrable “tal-ent for transforming neglected parts of the city into bustling mixed-used communities.” Over the last fifteen years there has been a dramatic renaissance of downtown Toronto as a place where people live—as well as work. And Lanterra has unquestionably been a major player in this extraordinary transformation with projects like The Toy Factory Lofts, Mu-rano and Burano on Bay Street, Maple Lead Square and Ice in the Southcore Financial Dis-trict, and One Bedford on Bloor Street.  Both Mark and Barry were veterans in the real estate business when they became partners back in 2002 after discovering they had com-plimentary skill sets: Mark handles design, architecture and marketing, Barry, acquisi-tion and construction. And they, amazingly, also had a similar vision of what was about to happen in downtown Toronto. It was a vision based on both demographics and the eco-nomics of the real-estate business. “A lot of people were being priced out of the single-family home business and a lot of young people wanted to live downtown where they work and play not in the suburbs,” says Mark. Both factors helped catalyze To-ronto’s downtown condo boom over the last decade. Add to this Mark and Barry’s genius for seeing potential in under-utilized real es-tate and you have The Lanterra Effect, the creation of extraordinary value in previously under-valued districts. “Our projects accomplish things that are not typical,” argues Mark. “They’re creating new neighbourhoods and new urban realities. That’s what we like to do.” And for proof, look no further than the new community created between the Air Canada and Rogers centres in downtown Toronto. “If we hadn’t gone in and built Maple Leaf Square and ICE Condos, you wouldn’t have seen a few million square feet of office space and other condos and ho-tels coming in.” Lanterra’s talent for seeing re-al-estate gold will soon work its magic in Don Mills, as well.
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Rodeo Drive Condos – Glamourous neighbour

Rodeo Drive Condos – Don Mills’ Glamourous neighbour
Is The Bridle Path Toronto’s Beverly Hills? Or is Beverly Hills LA’s The Bridle Path? Two good questions; no easy answer. When the legendary American rock star Prince died recently there was much discussion in the  media about the years he lived in, where else, The Bridle Path. That story was quickly su-perseded by news of rapper Drake’s plans to build a chateau-like residence in, where else, The Bridle Path. But richer-than-God rockers are not the only famous folks who call Can-ada’s most exclusive neighbourhood home. Among the local celebs none has perhaps more star power than Baron Black of Cross-harbour and the his lovely baroness, Barbara Amiel, and that is rather fitting since it was Conrad Black’s dad, George Montagu Black, who laid the foundations of Canada’s quintes-sential Blue Chip Paradise. George Black was a business partner of E.P. (Eddie) Taylor, the founder of Don Mills, and when Eddie bought an estate, Windfields Farm, on Bayview Avenue in the late 1940s, Black Sr., not to be outdone, bought much of the land next door. George Black once owned most of what presently constitutes the Bridle Path, but since he only required a few acres for himself, the rest was hived off into mini-mum three-acre-sized building lots for the “right sort.” So clearly from the get-go the ur-ban destinies of these two neighbourhoods, only minutes apart geographically, have been curiously intertwined: Taylor developed Don Mills and his partner was responsible for The Bridle Path. But the two neighbourhoods have more in common than just their geographical prox-imity and the close business relationship of their “developers.” At their inception, both were also design laboratories of mid-century modern design. Back then arguably the most famous house in the ‘hood was 75 The Bridle Path, the home of the renowned architect John C. Parkin, the designer of many of Don Mills’ most important buildings. Now demol-ished, the Parkin house was a sleek low-slung Bauhaus-style glass pavilion, the antithesis of the period-style palaces owned by celebs like Shark Tank star Robert Herjavec at 10 High Point Road.  And similarly many of Don Mills’ 1960s-style post-and-beam modernist bunga-lows are being replaced by ritzy McMansions.  For all these reasons and more Don Mills and The Bridle Path are historically joined at the hip and again there’s a resonance with Beverly Hills where the Rodeo Drive shopping strip is located in the chic but less expensive “Flats” section of the fashionable LA neighbourhood and the really big movie-star estates cling to the Hills. Sounds rather like Don Mills and The Bridle Path, no?
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Rodeo Condos – David Pontarini

Rodeo Condos – David Pontarini
Among the greatest practitioners of what’s called the Toronto School of Architecture is David Pontarini, a founding partner of one of the leading design practices in this country, the eponymously named Hariri Pontarini Architects (HPA). (The other, of course, is Siamak Hariri.) Since its inception in 1994, HPA has won an endless string of awards for its beautifully executed modernist buildings that are notable for their exquisite attention to detail and their sensitivity to the urban context in which they’re placed. An earlier generation of architects like Barton Myers and Jack Diamond pioneered the Toronto School’s acute sensitivity to urban context, respect for heritage buildings and attention to proportions in designing new buildings. But Pontarini believes the scale of that has expanded. “Today we think about the framework of the entire city.” Modernism and urbanism have become one and the same.Nowhere has his concern for “context” been more evident than in his design for Rodeo Drive in Don Mills. Perhaps because modernism first took root in this country in “Canada’s first planned community,” Pontarini was eager to create a building that was “clean, simple and elegant” like such modernist masterpieces as Mies van der Rohe’s landmark Toronto Dominion Centre. Set on a podium, the Rodeo Drive tower rises 32 floors and is characterized by both a striking black-and-white colour palette and a minimalist materials palette evocative of the classic modernist motto, “less is more.” “We weren’t trying to do too much, so its simpleblack surfaces, perforated metal screens, some articulated pre-cast panels, and fritted white glass, all of which speak to a modernist design vocabulary.”  Over the last decade Pontarini has designed some of the sleekest, most stunning glass towers that have become icons of Toronto’s recent condominium boom. Among them such skyscraping landmarks as the 76-storey One Bloor at Yonge and Bloor and the 60-storey Massey Tower presently rising on Yonge Street across from the Eaton Centre. “Rodeo Drive is a much more intimate building,” notes Pontarini, “because it has to fit into a different context, a low-rise retail context.” That is true, of course, but Rodeo Drive will still be the building in the precinct with the “towering” views over the green arcadia that distinguishes the Don Mills/Bridle Path neighbourhood, with park-like greenswards in every direction. “The city wasn’t keen to have the density on the outer edges of the shopping centre precinct which is why our site, in the centre of the development, received the density and the height.” Rodeo Drive residents with the sweeping park-like views will, of course, reap the rewards of that decision. “It is my hope that Rodeo Drive will be a  clean modern fresh expression of this neig- hbourhood’s unique modernist architectural legacy.”
“We weren’t trying to do too much, so it’s simple black surfaces, perforated metal screens, some articulated pre-cast panels, and fritted white glass, all of which speak to a modernist design vocabulary.”
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Rodeo Drive Condos – Aga Khan Museum

Rodeo Drive Condos – THE AGA KHAN AND HIS MUSEUM
DON MILLS’ GREAT BENEFACTOR
When David Pontarini, the cele-brated architect of Rodeo Drive, speaks about the recently opened Aga Khan Museum and Ismaili Centre at Eg-linton Avenue and Don Mills Road, words like “strikingly beautiful,” “wonderfully elegant” and “brilliantly executed” easily fall from his lips. And his fulsome praise echoes the more or less universal hosannas the project has received from the international architectural press. Built at a cost of around $350-million, the museum and prayer centre is an extraor-dinary act of generosity by the Aga Khan, the spiritual leader of the world’s Ismaili Muslims. Designed by the Pritzker Prize-winning Jap-anese architect Fumihiko Maki, the museum, clad in eye-popping Brazilian white granite, has been lauded for its almost other-worldly serenity, doubtless a reflection of its spare modernist aesthetic. Across an equally stun-ning plaza, itself a contemporary interpre-tation of a traditional Mughal garden, is the renowned Indian architect Charles Correa’s Ismaili Prayer Centre, with its extraordinary glass dome, an engineering feat many still struggle to explain; it’s that ingenious and novel. This extraordinary complex, the first museum in North America devoted solely to chronicling a millennia of Muslim art and cul-ture, is a testament to the Aga Khan’s often spoken belief that Canada is the global poster child for pluralism, diversity and tolerance, and nowhere are those qualities more in evidence that in the Don Mills community, itself. That fact is the result of a very wise decision made by the Aga Khan’s great friend, the late prime minister of Canada, Pierre Trudeau.
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Rodeo Drive Condo – Land-scape design

Rodeo Drive Condo – Land-scape design

When he began initially thinking about ways to approach the “green” spaces at Rodeo Drive, Robert Ng’s mind instinctively wandered to the great resort communities in Bali, Indonesia, South China and, of course, sout-hern California. And one image persisted: A magical cliffside space overlooking the ocean. It turned out to be a vision perfectly in sync with the outdoor landscaping oppor-tunities available at Rodeo Drive.  “Because the building is in close proximity to the street, there isn’t a lot of landscaping op-portunity at grade,” notes Ng, a principal at NAK Design Solutions, a firm that has been a force in Canadian public and private land-scape design for over thirty years. “An excit-ing landscape opportunity is the terrace on the 8th floor amenity level. It’s enormous and really does mimic a cliff overlooking an ocean, but in this instance it’s a ‘green ocean’ in the guise of the vast parklands that surround the project. It really is quite breathtaking and re-markably similar to the oceanic vistas you get in those beach communities south of LA.”   The indoor amenity activities overlook the terrace, so Ng was keen it lead it to a focal point, and that “Wow Factor” is created by an elevated negative-edge pool that from a dis-tance gives the illusion of water merging with the sky. The terrace design’s water feature re-flects and mirrors the changing elements of the sky. Next to the pool are an alley of cabanas for relaxation and the lush planting which mimic the “look” of southern spas, whether in Bali or Beverly Hills. “Evergreen boxwoods in a lin-ear fashion define the space,” notes Ng, “and colour will be provided by flowering annuals like red and white impatiens. Pampas grasses in planters along the space’s perimeter move beautifully in the wind creating a ‘living’ land-scape.” “Our ambition for the 8th floor terrace is a space that is pure, minimal,  linear and quite simply an inspiring place to spend time.”  Presently Rodeo Drive provides limited land-scaping opportunity at grade, but when the project is fully built-out, a plaza will connect the buildings giving T.O.’s Rodeo Drive some-thing akin to an LA landscaping vibe. “The signature element in the Southern Cali-fornia landscape are the palm trees because of their magnificent verticality,” says Ng. Along with street furniture, he envisions giv-ing the Rodeo Drive site a similar verticality, but instead of palms he sees columnar trees. “They really do brilliantly mimic that icon-ic central element of LA’s Rodeo Drive, but that’s down the road.”

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